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Scratch It

15 May

I’m pretty sure people know the sayin about what you should do if ya got an itch, although truthfully I’ve never seen a person get an itch like a horse does. I reckon that’s a good thing, considerin.

And an itch is a powerful thing. That’s another sayin.

And also, you got to use what ya got. That’s another one. That one might only be mine, though, but I can’t say for sure.

The truth is, a horse has got a lot of parts to himself that he can’t always reach by himself.

Here’s another sayin, and this one certainly is my own: You can’t scratch your own withers.

I realize people ain’t got long and proper necks, but you can’t do it, can you? At least with your withers, most times you can find another horse who’s willin to scratch it for you, ‘cause another horse understands.

That’s what I’m talkin about. There are some parts you can’t ask another horse to scratch. When you’re feelin all sweaty and scratchy, standin out in the sun at the start of the hot time, and there’s bits of winter haircoat still clingin to your horse-hide, most especially on your underside, you got to use what you got to get the job done.

Mostly, here in our own little County Island horse-corral, that means brush. We got a bunch of kinds of brush here, that’s called desert broom, and brittlebush, and also creosote. The best, far as I’m concerned, is the desert broom. Just like when our bucket gal, and your own bucket gal, too, I’d venture, sweeps around with a barn broom, you can use the desert broom to sweep around the bottom side of your sweaty, scratchy belly and really get in all them nooks and crannies. That’s the most I say about it, lest I become indelicate.

So, when I got an itch to scratch, I like to on purpose walk over the big, tall desert brooms, and scratch my belly as I go. If need be, I’ll walk back and forth across the tops of a few of ‘em ‘til the itch settles down. The bucket gal thinks it’s “quirky” of me. I don’t know what that means, but I know I don’t like it. Some horses, such as Original Coors and Coors Light, think it’s funny, but I say don’t knock it ‘til you’ve tried it.

If the desert broom’s big enough, you can even kinda stand over and inside it at the same time. And if ya stand there for a while, it helps keep the flies off your sweaty parts, on account of you’re camouflaged inside the brush. It’s like stealth mode or somethin.

This may or may not pertain to your own sweaty, scratchy situation, if ever you should find yourself in one, but it seems like good advice I should pass along, since I’m the only horse I see who’s got sense enough to be doin it. I try to be a helpful horse here on the County Island, even to those who likely don’t know they need help.

Standin’ in the scratchy sweet spot, inside some desert broom brush.

Standin’ in the scratchy sweet spot, inside some desert broom brush.

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5 Comments

Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Uncategorized

 

5 responses to “Scratch It

  1. AmyD

    May 15, 2013 at 9:07 pm

    That’s exactly how Rainy likes to scratch her navel when we’re out for a ride.

    At home, I scratch it for her.

     
  2. Lori

    May 19, 2013 at 7:06 pm

    This is Kokomo
    I likes to get down in the gravely/sandy arena on my belly with my front legs stretched out in front and my back legs frogged out the sides and just scrub and scrub and groan and …. well you get the picture. My halter holder said I looks like some kind of mutated crab. Not havin seen a mutated crab I am not sure if there is a resemblance or not.

     
  3. Whiskey Ranch-Horse

    May 19, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    Miss AmyD, I shoulda guessed your good Rainy horse was smart enough to do that! But I wouldn’t like it if my bucket gal tried to scratch my belly for me. I don’t like to talk about it much, but my belly’s downright ticklish.

     
  4. Whiskey Ranch-Horse

    May 19, 2013 at 8:24 pm

    Miss Kokomo mare, I ain’t got no idea what a mutated crab is, but I can guess it ain’t right. Still and all, a horse has got to whatever it takes to get his, or her, itch scratched. And therefore I don’t judge how other horses choose to do it. Well, maybe unless it’s Coors or Coors Light.

     

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